Prints & Photography Online Auction

September 21, 2017

LOT 82
Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)
  • Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952)

82

Edward S. Curtis (1868 - 1952), American

FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN (EIGHT PORTRAITS), ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1907-1930:
YELLOW KIDNEY-PIEGAN, 1910, PLATE NO. 196;
BEAR’S BELLY - AKIKARA; 1908;
CHEYENNE WARRIORS, PLATE NO. 215; 1905;
VASH GON - JICARILLA; 1904;
ESKADI - APACHE, PLATE NO. 15
1903;
SLOW HULL - OGALALA; 1907;
HORSE CAPTURE - ATSINA; 1908;
QUILCENE BOY; 1912

Eight photogravures on Holland or Van Gelder paper; each with letters: “From Copyright Photograph by E.S. Curtis” and published by John Andrew & Son.
Plate 18.2" x 13.5" — 44.5 x 31.8 cm.

Estimate $2,400-$4,000

Realised: $2,500
Price Includes Buyer's Premium ?

About artist/note:

Over his 30-year career, Edward Curtis captured 40,000 photographs of over 80 Native North American tribes. Financed by the American banker J.P. Morgan in 1906, the artist’s goal was to record as much of Native American traditional life as possible. The true strength of Curtis’s work is his portraiture of all tribal members from the highest chieftains to women and children. Recording and immortally capturing their culture through ritual, dress, chants and daily life, these photogravures sadly pay homage to tribes who have vanished or in severe decline. The true beauty of these portraits not only lies in Curtis’s craft, but more importantly within his subjects. The bravery, honour and pride of these tribes resonate with current collectors.



Provenance:

Private Collection, Toronto

Additional Info:

Department: International Art
Medium: Works on Paper