The American and Canadian Salon

March 20 — 25, 2021
Auction begins to close at 2 pm ET

Online Auction
LOT 245

Lot 245

19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL

19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
Lot 245 Details
19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL

PORTRAITS OF A PROMINENT SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO FAMILY: A LADY; A GENTLEMAN, LATE 19TH CENTURY

pair of oils on canvas, each painted over a photographic base, matted and framed in the oval. Each unsigned. In matching antique frames with oval mats.
Each 30 ins x 25 ins; 76.2 cms x 63.5 cms

Estimate $1,000-$1,500

Realised: $480
Price Includes Buyer's Premium ?

Lot Report

Additional Images
19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
  • 19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
  • 19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
  • 19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
  • 19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
  • 19TH CENTURY CANADIAN SCHOOL
Provenance:

Private Collection for over 40 years from a Southwestern Ontario collection;
From whom purchased by the present Private Collection, Toronto

Note:

See Mervyn Ruggles' review "Paintings on a Photographic Base" for a discussion on the history of the oil portrait painted over a photographic base that was popular in the second half of the 19th century.

Ruggles continues: "Shortly after the invention of photography, artists in the United States and Canada began to explore in several ways the possibilities of the photographic image for their own use. Towards the latter part of the 19th century, some artists advertised themselves as “artist-photographers,” reflecting the aura of prestige of photography, which seemed to attract the notice of the general public. As the technical aspects improved, especially in the making of photographs, photographers who did not have artistic talents hired artists to work for them in the photo studio. Their patrons were eager to have photographs resemble painted likenesses. Prominent artists participated actively in producing painted photographs. Photographers prepared enlargements which were then painted over in oils by staff artists. By the 1860s, coloured portraits became fashionable and techniques improved rapidly. Methods were found to photosensitize the canvas surface on which the enlarged portrait was projected and fixed. The artist then applied paint directly on the image. The finished art work would later be varnished and placed in an ornamented gilt frame. Frequently, these paintings are not easily recognized as being based directly on a photo image.”

"These portraits were popular because they were less costly than free-hand paintings which required long sittings. They also had the detail and realism that often were not captured in conventional oil portraits.”

CONDITION DETAILS

For condition information please contact the specialist.

LOT 245
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About Condition Ratings

  • 5 Stars: Excellent - No discernable damage, flaws or imperfections
  • 4 Stars: Very Good - Minor flaws or imperfections visible only under close inspection using specialised instruments or black light
  • 3 Stars: Good - Minor flaws visible upon inspection under standard lighting
  • 2 Stars: Fair - Exhibits flaws or damage that may draw the eye under standard lighting
  • 1 Star: Poor - Flaws or damage immediately apparent under standard lighting (examples: missing components, rips, broken glass, damaged surfaces, etc.)

Note: Condition ratings and condition details are the subjective opinions of our specialists and should be used as a guide only. Waddington’s uses due care when preparing condition details, however, our staff are not professional restorers or conservators. Condition details and reports are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the buyer’s terms and conditions of sale. In all cases the prospective purchaser is responsible for inspecting the property themselves prior to placing a bid.